Quick Treatments for Prolonged Seizures

Faster, more effective relief of prolonged seizures (which last more than five minutes) may be available with medicine delivered into a muscle via an autoinjector, according to a study recently published by the New England Journal of Medicine. An autoinjector is similar to the EpiPen used to treat serious allergic reactions. This study represents a… Read more »

Epilepsy Surgery Improves Seizure Control and Quality of Life

A 26-year follow-up study published in the journal Epilepsia revealed that after epilepsy surgery, nearly half of participants were free of disabling seizures and 80 percent reported better quality of life than before surgery. Spanning over three decades, the study is the longest follow-up of epilepsy surgery patients. However, nothing has changed in that time… Read more »

Anti-Tobacco Ads Show Painful Effects of Smoking

The painful reality of illness and damage suffered by real people because of smoking is the focus of a new anti-tobacco ad campaign. Launched by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the ads show the toll of illnesses caused by smoking and secondhand smoke. The “Tips from Former Smokers” campaign features ex-smokers with tobacco-related… Read more »

Heart Health: What Is Target Heart Rate?

Heart Health: What Is Target Heart Rate? Exercise is an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but how do you know if you are doing it properly in order to get the best result? In “Heart Health: What is Target Heart Rate?” Viviana Gebruers, a senior exercise physiologist at North Shore-LIJ’s Southside Hospital, explains… Read more »

Flu Drug Seems to Help After Traumatic Brain Injury

In a recent study published in the The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that Amantadine, a drug typically used to treat the flu and Parkinson’s disease, appears to speed recovery in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. It is an important study because it demonstrated for the first time an improvement in the level… Read more »

Nicotine During Pregnancy Increases the Rick of Colic

Babies are more likely to have colic when their mothers smoked or used nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy, according to research just published in the journal Pediatrics. A significantly increased risk of infantile colic—ranging from 30 to 60 percent—was associated with prenatal nicotine exposure in the study of more than 63,000 mothers in the Danish… Read more »

Clouded in Smoke: Cigarettes Dull the Male Brain

Everyone knows smoking is dumb. Now it looks like it makes you dumb, too: A recent study in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggests that male smokers of a certain age experience faster loss of brain power. Researchers found that, compared to men who never smoked, middle-aged men smokers are likely to experience more rapid… Read more »

In the News: March Week 1

The expertise of our cardiac specialists has been making a lot of news in recent weeks, particularly those specializing in heart valve replacements. As you’ll see in the featured stories below, a Queens woman was the first patient in New York – and only the second in the nation – to have a mitral valve… Read more »

Lead in Lipstick Should Worry the FDA—and You, Too

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a report that it found lead in hundreds of shades of popular brands of lipstick found everywhere from drugstores to department stores. The agency said that the lead levels it found pose no health risk. However, this claim flies in the face of scientific consensus that there… Read more »

Weight Training May Improve Parkinson’s Symptoms

Weight training may improve the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 64th Annual Meeting in New Orleans this coming April. In the study, 48 people with Parkinson’s disease used progressive resistance exercise (weight training) or fitness counts, which included flexibility, balance… Read more »