10 Years Without Secondhand Smoke

New York State enacted the Clean Indoor Air Act 10 years ago today to protect workers from secondhand smoke and help reduce smoking rates. The law bans smoking in workplaces and entertainment/leisure venues—saving nonsmokers from inhaling unwanted tobacco smoke and preventing millions of New Yorkers from developing smoking-related illness. Eliminating smoking indoors is the only… Read more »

Sunburn Today, Skin Cancer Tomorrow?

While enjoying the extra hours of summer sunshine, keep an eye on your exposure to avoid developing skin cancer. Repeated, unprotected exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight (plus man-made sources like tanning beds) increases your risk of skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Most skin cancers probably come from exposure that happened… Read more »

PTSD Affects Non-Veterans, Too

With our country’s recent military conflicts, the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has gained attention because it affects so many of our soldiers (up to 20 percent). Yet this condition can strike anyone—not just those who have been to war. PTSD is a reaction to trauma. Trauma is a Greek word that means “wound.”… Read more »

Don’t Run from Your Mammogram

Some women put off their mammogram appointment to avoid breast compression. Still, the procedure’s benefits make it worth some temporary discomfort. For instance: Mammograms have helped breast cancer mortality rates drop by nearly a third in the US since 1990. Of all the years of life saved by mammography, 40 percent are for women in… Read more »

FDA Approves New ADHD Test

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a new medical device to help assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for youngsters between 6 to 17. But the new ADHD test does not eliminate the need for a careful clinical assessment by a physician, psychologist or other licensed professional. Focusing on EEG (electroencephalogram) patterns, this is the… Read more »

Omega-3 Fish Oil: Bad for the Prostate?

Consuming large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids may not be right for everyone: Researchers have observed a link between the intake of omega-3 —found in fish-oil supplements and fresh tuna, salmon, and trout–and an increased risk of prostate cancer. Scientists found a strong association between high consumption of omega-3 fatty acids and a 43 percent… Read more »

Randy Travis Suffers Stroke

Country singer Randy Travis, 54, has been admitted to a Texas hospital after suffering a stroke, a complication due to a recent bout of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure.  Mr. Travis underwent surgery to relieve the pressure on his brain, according to news reports. Cardiomyopathy (a weakening of the heart muscle) occurs when the heart… Read more »

Sunglasses Are Your Eyes’ Best Friend

Sunglasses aren’t just a fashion statement, they are essential to help prevent eye disease. The harmful UV (ultraviolet) rays from sunlight can cause many ocular conditions, like cataracts, macular degeneration, eyelid and eye cancers and such unsightly growths as pinguecula or pterygia. Wearing sunglasses outside is critical year-round, not just on sunny days. In fact,… Read more »

July 4th, Yankee Pride and ALS

As we celebrate Independence Day, we also remember the late Yankee, Lou Gehrig–one of the greatest players in baseball history. On his 36th birthday in 1939, Mr. Gerhig was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a very rare form of disease that attacks nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Now commonly called Lou… Read more »

Protect Yourself from a Heart Attack on Vacation

Health risks don’t take time off. A growing body of evidence suggests it’s not uncommon to have a heart attack on vacation. So if you have a heart condition, high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure—or a family history of any of these—be mindful of the physical and emotional tolls that traveling or vacationing can take…. Read more »