Prevention Works to Protect Cervical Health

Proper screening and vaccination do a great job at guarding cervical health. Still, there are 12,000 cervical cancer US diagnoses annually–and more than 4,000 women die each year as a result, according to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition. The leading threat to cervical health is HPV (human papillomavirus) infection. HPV alters the cells of the… Read more »

Gene Therapy: A New Possibility
for Parkinson’s Patients

A new gene therapy called ProSavin may help reduce motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, suggests a recent study published in The Lancet. Although Parkinson’s cannot be cured, medications can improve symptoms. Typically, treatment includes dopamine-replacement therapy to replenish the main brain chemical that patients with Parkinson’s lose. This new gene therapy restores the patient’s dopamine… posted in: Neuro, Newstags:


Are the New Blood Pressure Guidelines for You?

People older than 60 should strive for blood pressure 149/90, according to new hypertension guidelines recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The previous goal for the “top” (systolic) number was 140 (the “bottom” [diastolic] number hasn’t changed). Furthermore, the committee increased the threshold for treatment for diabetic and kidney-disease patients to… Read more »

Stay Warm in the Polar Vortex–
and Avoid Hypothermia

As the polar vortex causes temperatures to drop dramatically, make sure to stay warm and keep hypothermia at bay. Hypothermia (abnormally low body temperature) affects the brain, disrupting the ability to think clearly or move well. Severely low body temperature can even lead to heart failure and death. Hypothermia often looks different from one person… posted in: Children's Health, Geriatric Care, News, Wellnesstags:


Diversity in Health Care and Research

The National Institutes of Health recently announced new funding opportunities to develop ways to engage researchers from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences. “There is a compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical research workforce,” said Francis Collins, MD, PhD, director of the institutes. The North Shore-LIJ Health System has been fostering diversity in medical… Read more »

The 2014 Surgeon General’s Report
on Smoking and Health

In 1964, the Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health was the first document to link smoking with lung cancer and heart disease. The landmark report was first of more than 30 on smoking and tobacco use. Following the publication, many Americans quit smoking and new laws required warnings on cigarette packaging and banned cigarette… posted in: Addiction, Cancer, Heart Health, News, Wellnesstags:


It’s True:
Sprite Helps Hangovers

If you over-indulge tonight, don’t reach for the hair of the dog tomorrow. There’s a new way to cope with morning-after headache, nausea and general misery: A can of Sprite helps hangovers. Certain chemicals in Sprite reduce the chance of a hangover headache the day after drinking too much alcohol, according to results from a… posted in: Addiction, Neuro, Wellnesstags:


How a Teen Gene Glitch
May Cause Behavioral Disorders

Adolescence is a time of major brain development. During that period, a process called “pruning” physically transforms the teenage brain into the young adult brain. Highly organized, tightly controlled and greatly influenced by genes and environment, this process allows us to function as healthy young adults. If these controls malfunction, our brains can struggle to… posted in: Behavioral Health, Researchtags:


New Magnetic Stimulator May Relieve Migraine Pain

A new magnetic stimulator to relieve pain associated with migraine headaches may offer hope to millions of migraine sufferers. Recently, the FDA approved the Cerena transcranial magnetic stimulator (TMS) for people who suffer from migraine headaches that are preceded by aura, which can include a tingling sensation in the arms or legs and/or visions of… Read more »

FDA Takes Aim at Antibiotics in Agricultural Industry

The US agricultural industry has routinely fed antibiotics to livestock and poultry for more than 50 years. In fact, while medical use of antibiotics accounts for approximately 20 percent of global sales, the agricultural industry buys the other 80 percent as a way to promote weight gain and prevent disease in livestock and poultry. Such… Read more »