Posts Categorized: Research

Shedding Light on Sarcoidosis

Normally, the immune system defends the body against foreign or harmful substances, sending special cells to protect organs. These cells release chemicals that recruit other cells to isolate and destroy the harmful substance. Inflammation occurs during this process. Once the harmful substance is gone, the cells and the inflammation go away…but not always. Consider sarcoidosis,… Read more »

Alive and Well with Huntington’s Disease

Spend next Wednesday evening with patients, researchers and clinicians who collaborate to understand Huntington’s disease. Patients with this genetic neural disorder struggle with muscle coordination plus their attention span, memory, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, language, learning and/or emotions. On April 16 at 5 p.m., one of my patients and her daughter will share their… posted in: Event, Movement Disorders, Neuro, Research tags:


Science Careers’ Surprising Challenges

Once scientists start working, it can be hard for us to know how to take our science careers to the next level. At times, we must be assertive–even aggressive—to advocate for ourselves or our ideas. Many of us choose science careers because we like knowing how things work. We don’t tend toward extroversion or confrontation…. Read more »

Diversity in Health Care and Research

The National Institutes of Health recently announced new funding opportunities to develop ways to engage researchers from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences. “There is a compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical research workforce,” said Francis Collins, MD, PhD, director of the institutes. The North Shore-LIJ Health System has been fostering diversity in medical… Read more »

How a Teen Gene Glitch
May Cause Behavioral Disorders

Adolescence is a time of major brain development. During that period, a process called “pruning” physically transforms the teenage brain into the young adult brain. Highly organized, tightly controlled and greatly influenced by genes and environment, this process allows us to function as healthy young adults. If these controls malfunction, our brains can struggle to… posted in: Behavioral Health, Research tags:


Cause for Hope on World AIDS Day

Tomorrow is the 25th annual observance of World AIDS Day. This year’s theme–Shared Responsibility: Strengthening Results for an AIDS-Free Generation—calls for collaboration between governments, researchers and the community to improve the lives of people with HIV/AIDS. While there is no cure for AIDS, there has been significant progress in prevention and treatment: The number of… Read more »

Free Screening: Alive Inside

Alive Inside is a moving documentary that shows how music therapy can awaken patients with memory disorders. Come to a free screening this Thursday, 7:30 p.m., at the Landmark on Main Street in Port Washington. Following Alive Inside, Dan Cohen, MSW, founder of Music and Memory, will have a meaningful discussion with Maria Carney, MD,… posted in: Geriatric Care, News, Research, Wellness tags:


The Football Concussion Crisis

Last night’s PBS Frontline episode, “League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis,” explored how football concussions affect the brain. Researchers must continue to explore how playing football affects the brain, Peter Davies, PhD, told the program producers. An investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Dr. Davies raised important questions that still need to… Read more »

Huntington’s Disease Breakthrough

Imaging brain metabolism with PET (positron emission tomography) can be used to track disease progression in clinically normal carriers of the Huntington’s disease gene who have yet to develop symptoms, according to a study my colleagues and I just published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Huntington’s disease is extremely debilitating. It causes the progressive… Read more »

Why Do Some Survive Cancer and Others Don’t?

Sunday, June 2, is National Cancer Survivors Day—a time when millions celebrate life. The celebration raises the question, “Why isn’t everyone who is diagnosed with cancer a survivor?” For example, why do more than 70 percent of women diagnosed with Stage III ovarian cancer succumb to the disease within 5 years, while less than 30… Read more »