Posts Categorized: Neuro

New MS Drug Reduces Relapses 53%

The FDA has just approved a promising new MS drug (MS is multiple sclerosis). Called Tecfidera or BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate), the new MS drug is a twice-daily capsule that reduces relapses by 53 percent and slows the progression of disability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have shown that the new MS drug  reduces the accumulation… Read more »

Migraine with Aura May Raise Risk of Heart Trouble

Women who suffer from migraine with aura may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or blood clot, according to two studies presented this week at the American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting. One study shows that migraine with aura (which involves visual problems such as flashing lights) is a strong contributor to… Read more »

Mediterranean Diet Reduces Risk of Major Cardiovascular Events, Stroke by 30%

A Mediterranean diet including extra-virgin olive oil or mixed nuts cuts the risk of stroke and other major cardiovascular events by as much as 30 percent among those at high-risk, according to a study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine. While there have been numerous studies on the cardiovascular benefits of the… Read more »

Surgical Delivery of Clot-Busting Drug Shows Promise

Stroke patients who had surgery to deliver the clot-busting drug tPA directly into the brain experienced better and quicker recovery than those who received standard treatment, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. There are two types of stroke: hemorrhagic and ischemic. Though their symptoms appear similar, they are very different health… Read more »

Mary from Little House Didn’t Get Scarlet Fever

In Laura Ingalls Wilder’s semi-autobiographical Little House book series, her sister Mary became ill with fever and severe headache. “Far worst of all, (scarlet) fever had settled in Mary’s eyes, and Mary was blind,” the author wrote. Yet it was viral meningoencephalitis (a viral brain infection) that caused Mary’s illness and subsequent blindness—not scarlet fever, according… Read more »

Ariel Sharon Won’t Wake Up

Recent reports of evaluating former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) do not indicate that he is on the verge of awakening from a coma after his severe stroke seven years ago. For 20 years, fMRI has been a useful and often fascinating tool for neuroscientists to investigate… Read more »

Former NFL Player Suffered Degenerative Brain Disease

Former NFL linebacker Junior Seau suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease linked to repeated head trauma, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Degenerative brain disease is widely associated with athletes who have sustained repetitive blows to the head. The NIH’s discovery, made in a controlled study that included Mr…. Read more »

Young Athletes Need Protection After Concussion

Young people with sports-related concussions who return to play too soon risk devastation or death from “second impact syndrome,” according to the new edition of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics. The journal details the case of a 23-year-old Indiana man who returned to high school football following a concussion. Six years later, he is wheelchair-bound… Read more »

Hillary Clinton’s Blood Clot Related to Concussion

Recent reports reveal that US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was hospitalized for a blood clot that doctors discovered during a follow-up exam related to her recent concussion. Although the location hasn’t been revealed, Secretary Clinton’s blood clot is probably in the leg(s) rather than her brain. This is referred to as deep vein thrombosis… Read more »

Strokes in Young People Are Increasing

Actor Frankie Muniz’s stroke at age 26 spotlights an alarming health trend: Clinicians are seeing more young people having strokes without a clear cause. Historically, stroke was considered a problem for the elderly and increased risk was associated with pre-existing hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) and heart disease. Young adults who had strokes often had… Read more »