Posts Categorized: Cancer

Gamma Knife Transforms Brain Tumor Treatment

Not so long ago, a small tumor deep within the brain could not be safely treated with traditional surgery or radiation without unacceptable risks of harm from the surgical procedure or from radiation’s effects on normal tissues. Now, we can destroy deep-seated brain tumors—up to about half an inch—with a targeted dose of 200 radiation… Read more »

Smoke-Free Laws Help Kids, Too

Smoke-free laws provide substantial health benefits for children, according to a recent study in the Lancet. Environments free of second-hand smoke are associated with a considerable decrease in premature births and a 10 percent reduction in hospitalizations for asthma in children, the Lancet analysis indicates. Multiple studies have demonstrated that smoke-free environments result in significantly… Read more »

Sexuality in the Breast Cancer Survivor: Free Event

Sexuality is an integral part of life. Yet cancer diagnosis and treatment can alter this facet of health and well-being. Every breast cancer survivor experiences some kind of sexual dysfunction, yet “the discussion” is often limited, awkward–or nonexistent. Please join us for “Lets Discuss Sexuality in the Breast Cancer Survivor” next Tuesday from 6:30 to… Read more »

Reduce Cancer Risk with a Healthy Diet

You can reduce cancer risk–including colorectal cancer, breast cancer and others–with a diet that is high in vegetables, fruit and whole grains and low in red and processed meats. Regularly eating food with good-for-you nutrients also reduces other health threats, like cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also a risk factor for many forms of cancer (breast;… Read more »

Colonoscopy Dramatically Decreases
Colon Cancer Rates

Colorectal cancer incidence rates dropped 30 percent in 10 years among adults 50 and up, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). US patients older than 65 saw the largest decrease. ACS credits the trends primarily to widespread colonoscopy screening. The practice has almost tripled among adults ages 50 to 75, from 19 percent in… posted in: Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancer tags:


Colorectal Cancer Is Common, Preventable

Colorectal cancer–cancer of the colon and rectum–doesn’t discriminate. It affects people in all racial and ethnic groups–most often in people 50 and older. There are often no signs or symptoms, which makes screening vital. The best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to get screened regularly starting at age 50. The disease strikes men and… Read more »

Re-Resolution: Stop Smoking Again

If your “stop smoking” New Year’s resolution already seems like a distant memory, don’t give up. Most smoking-cessation studies conclude that motivation, not a date on the calendar, is the most important factor in predicting whether or not a smoker will quit for keeps. Concerns about the cost to your current or future health, the… posted in: Addiction, Lung Cancer, Wellness tags:


A Bridge for Breast Cancer Survivors

Getting together with other breast cancer survivors can be one of the best ways to cope with post-treatment concerns. Connecting with others who have similar experiences also helps breast cancer survivors look ahead toward the future. Bridge to Survivorship is a free series for breast cancer patients who have finished active treatment and seek information… Read more »

Misleading Mammography Study Puts Women at Risk

When the British Medical Journal recently published an article that mistakenly concluded that annual mammography doesn’t save lives, news outlets like the New York Times jumped on the story—to the disservice of their readers. The study was based on follow-up results of the Canadian Breast Cancer Screening Study (CNBSS), a five-year study conducted from 1980… Read more »

Anti-Smoking Campaign Targets At-Risk Youth

Almost all smokers get addicted to cigarettes very young, according to The Health Consequences of Smoking, published last month by the US Surgeon General. Nearly 90 percent of smokers start before 18 and 98 percent by 26; three-quarters of all teen smokers become adult smokers. If current trends in smoking and smoking initiation stay the… Read more »