Cynthia Harden, MD

Chief, Epilepsy and Electroencephalography
North Shore-LIJ Health System
Professor, Neurology
Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine


Recent Posts By: Cynthia Harden, MD

Levetiracetam Is Safe During Pregnancy

Pregnant women with epilepsy who control seizures with levetiracetam (Keppra, Keppra XR) can expect that it will not affect their child’s later development. Taken during pregnancy, the medication does not appear to be associated with developmental problems in preschool children, according to a recent study published in the journal Neurology. The study is reassuring for… Read more »

Women with Epilepsy, Trying to Conceive

Epilepsy is a condition that affects the nervous system and can cause debilitating seizures. Various biological and social differences cause women to experience epilepsy differently than men. As a result, women with epilepsy face different challenges throughout life—for instance, when they try to conceive. Epilepsy affects almost one million American women of childbearing age; nearly… Read more »

Response to First Treatment May Predict Epilepsy’s Course

In patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the likelihood that they will continue to have seizures may well depend on their response to the initial anti-seizure medication given after their diagnosis. According to a recent study published in Neurology, researchers found that 50 percent of the people in the study were seizure-free after the first medication they… Read more »

Monitoring Spinal Cord During Surgery May Prevent Paralysis

The American Academy of Neurology recommends monitoring the spinal cord during spinal surgery and certain chest surgeries to help prevent paralysis or loss of muscle function related to the surgeries, according to an updated guideline published recently in Neurology, the academy’s medical journal. This report, which I cowrote, provides the most comprehensive and compelling evidence… Read more »

Quick Treatments for Prolonged Seizures

Faster, more effective relief of prolonged seizures (which last more than five minutes) may be available with medicine delivered into a muscle via an autoinjector, according to a study recently published by the New England Journal of Medicine. An autoinjector is similar to the EpiPen used to treat serious allergic reactions. This study represents a… Read more »