Posts By: North Shore-LIJ

To Be Fit – or to Lose Fat? That Is the Question

Jean Cacciabaudo, MD The great debate in wellness focuses on fitness vs. fatness. Most healthcare professionals encourage overweight patients to get down to a healthy weight. However, recent research suggests that getting to a healthy weight and maintaining it may be daunting, since patients often yo-yo between weight loss and gain. So where should we… Read more »

Women, Know Your Heart Disease Risk!

Suzanne Steinbaum, DO If you’re a woman, heart disease is your greatest health threat so knowing your risk is essential. How you live can have serious consequences. For instance, atherosclerosis (plaque in the arteries) builds up when there is damage to the lining of the arteries, frequently due to lifestyle. But high blood pressure, high… Read more »

Women’s Heart Attack Symptoms May Surprise You

Stacey Rosen, MD Think heart health is a “men’s problem”? Guess again. In fact, more American women die from heart attacks (also called myocardial infarction or MI) than men every year. Almost everyone knows that severe chest pain, shortness of breath and light-headedness can signify an MI. While many women experience heart attacks this way,… Read more »

In the News: February Week 1

Terry Lynam LIJ Medical Center opened the Katz Women’s Hospital, welcoming its first baby on January 25. LIJ Medical Center was in the news again thanks to its cardiothoracic team, which implanted a new heart valve decide to treat patients with failing heart valves without performing surgery – the first hospital on Long Island and… Read more »

Kids Don’t Gain Weight Just Due to Junk Food at School

Think childhood obesity is on the rise because of junk food and soft drinks at school? Think again. In fact, exposure to unhealthy food at school is not associated with chubby children, according to a new report. Published in Sociology of Education, the study followed almost 20,000 American children as they progressed from fifth to… Read more »

Reduce PFC Exposure to Protect Health

Kid’s vaccinations may be rendered less effective because of chemicals often found in homes, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association. PFCs (perfluorinated compounds) are chemicals found in many everyday items around the house, like cookware, food packaging, home furnishings, microwavable popcorn and often tap water. Most of us, including our children, have… Read more »

Genetics Discovery Suggests New Approaches for Drug Development

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health identified a genetic mutation in three unrelated families that cases a rare immune disorder, according to a study published in this month’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers named this immune disorder PLCG2- associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation, or PLAID. Its symptoms include… Read more »

Nicotine Patch May Help Memory Impairment

Nicotine patches may ease mild cognitive impairment, according to a new study in the journal Neurology. Study participants showed improved attention plus improvements in secondary measures of attention, memory and though-processing speed. But the research did not demonstrate a significant difference between nicotine and placebo on overall improvement. The study was conducted with 74 non-smokers… Read more »

Can Lower BMI Be an Early Sign for Alzheimer’s Disease?

Obesity, a disease in itself, is a well known cause of other diseases. Midlife obesity, in particular, has been linked with an increased risk of late-life dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, patients who have dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease are actually more likely to be underweight. The cause of this association has been unclear. It… Read more »