Romaine for Your Salad Days

As the summer kicks off, take a break from the stove with the taste of cool, crisp romaine lettuce in today’s Greek Salad.

This is the perfect time to buy romaine: June is the heart of the harvest season, which runs from early spring into late summer. While it’s low in calories, romaine is a very good source of folate, Vitamin K and Vitamin A. In addition to serving as a base for salad, single leaves work well as no-carb wraps, and are tastier toppers than iceberg lettuce for sandwiches. (See below for tips on storage and preparation.)

South Oaks Hospital’s Chef Philip Sosnicki has adapted this diner classic to complement home-style meals. Let us know how you like it in the comments section.

Servings: 4
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Per serving: 120 calories, 10 grams of fat, 170 grams of sodium

Ingredients:
2 Tomatoes
1 ¼ Cucumber
5/8 Red onion
3 Tbsp. Olive oil
2 ¾ tsp. Lemon juice
1 tsp. Oregano
To taste Salt and pepper
2/3 cup Feta cheese
4 Greek olives
¾ head Romaine lettuce

Directions:
Combine tomatoes, cucumber, and onion in a mixing bowl. Sprinkle with oil, lemon juice, oregano, salt and pepper. Place over torn romaine leaves, then add cheese and olives.

3 Ways to Get the Most from Your Romaine

This recipe only calls for three-quarters of a head of romaine. Proper care of the greens means  getting the most bang for your buck in the Greek Salad and in your leftovers, too.

  1. Like other kinds of lettuce, romaine can last up to five days in the refrigerator’s crisper drawer; 32 degrees Fahrenheit and high humidity is best, according to the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
  2. Store romaine unwashed and wrapped in plastic. Separate it from apples or pears, whose natural ripening agents will cause romaine to decay faster.
  3. Always wash any kind of lettuce thoroughly before eating. Tear romaine leaves—don’t cut them–to preserve their vitamins and reduce “rusty” discoloration.

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