Monthly Archives: March 2012

In the News: March Week 4

At least in their private thoughts, some physicians and nurses have undoubtedly wished they could “fire” their non-compliant patients who refuse to take guidance. Watch how Cohen Children’s Medical Center’s Chief of General Pediatrics Dr. Henry Bernstein deftly responded to that question Wednesday during an NBC-TV “Today” interview about parents who refuse to let their… Read more »

Monitoring Spinal Cord During Surgery May Prevent Paralysis

The American Academy of Neurology recommends monitoring the spinal cord during spinal surgery and certain chest surgeries to help prevent paralysis or loss of muscle function related to the surgeries, according to an updated guideline published recently in Neurology, the academy’s medical journal. This report, which I cowrote, provides the most comprehensive and compelling evidence… Read more »

Breaking Down the Supreme Court, the Affordable Care Act and the Individual Mandate

To understand how US Supreme Court arguments over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will be different and why it will dominate the news until the court reaches a decision in June, consider this: The time allotted for arguments – the period in which plaintiffs and defendants present their views to the justices –… Read more »

Controversy Persists About Prostate Cancer Screening

In 2009, the publication of the results of two large screening studies ignited the controversy over prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer screening. Now, both studies have been updated and debate continues. This month, the New England Journal of Medicine published an update of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC)… Read more »

Quick Treatments for Prolonged Seizures

Faster, more effective relief of prolonged seizures (which last more than five minutes) may be available with medicine delivered into a muscle via an autoinjector, according to a study recently published by the New England Journal of Medicine. An autoinjector is similar to the EpiPen used to treat serious allergic reactions. This study represents a… Read more »

Epilepsy Surgery Improves Seizure Control and Quality of Life

A 26-year follow-up study published in the journal Epilepsia revealed that after epilepsy surgery, nearly half of participants were free of disabling seizures and 80 percent reported better quality of life than before surgery. Spanning over three decades, the study is the longest follow-up of epilepsy surgery patients. However, nothing has changed in that time… Read more »

Anti-Tobacco Ads Show Painful Effects of Smoking

The painful reality of illness and damage suffered by real people because of smoking is the focus of a new anti-tobacco ad campaign. Launched by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the ads show the toll of illnesses caused by smoking and secondhand smoke. The “Tips from Former Smokers” campaign features ex-smokers with tobacco-related… Read more »

Heart Health: What Is Target Heart Rate?

Heart Health: What Is Target Heart Rate? Exercise is an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but how do you know if you are doing it properly in order to get the best result? In “Heart Health: What is Target Heart Rate?” Viviana Gebruers, a senior exercise physiologist at North Shore-LIJ’s Southside Hospital, explains… Read more »

Nicotine During Pregnancy Increases the Rick of Colic

Babies are more likely to have colic when their mothers smoked or used nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy, according to research just published in the journal Pediatrics. A significantly increased risk of infantile colic—ranging from 30 to 60 percent—was associated with prenatal nicotine exposure in the study of more than 63,000 mothers in the Danish… Read more »